Archive for the ‘Social Media’ Category

6 Tips for Better Tweets

I am no Twitter veteran but I have been writing copy for marketing-related initiatives for nearly 25 years. So once I joined Twitter, it didn’t take me long to realize that many companies using Twitter as a marketing vehicle are making some key mistakes when they tweet.
Here are six tips for creating tweets that will help you more effectively market your products and services, as well as build your brand:
Treat Twitter like any other marketing vehicle. Twitter may be a relatively new tool, but it still has power. So before you start tapping away random tweets and trying to connect with other Twitterers, take time to think about how you want to use Twitter to support your current marketing strategy. Don’t just wing it. Research what the experts say in terms of what makes it an effective tool. (Hint: it does not involve posting an endless stream of sales messages. It involves finding ways to add value and to engage.)
Know your audience. As with any marketing vehicle, you need to keep your target market and your consumer in mind at all times. Do not assume that all of your Twitter followers are your buyers. They are not. Instead, stay focused and clear on who you want to reach and what you want to say. Then be certain that every tweet appeals to your audience of potential prospects and consumers in some way, rather than simply the Twitter masses.
Craft your tweets with care.  Because of its sense of immediacy, I see many companies take a hurried, somewhat careless approach to their tweets. For the simple reason that you have the smallest space possible for your tweet message (140 characters or less), you should take time to write it well. When you have an idea for a tweet, write it several different ways. What are you trying to accomplish with that tweet? Do you want to draw in your reader? Are you looking for feedback? Do you want to provide customers with a special offer? Are you hoping to pass along important information or a useful link? Every tweet, regardless of its content, can be structured myriad ways. Make the effort to draft several versions, making each one clear and compelling. Pick the strongest. Then post it. If there are several you like, create a library that will allow you to post different versions at various times.
Lace your tweets with keywords. Not every tweet needs to feature keywords, but certainly some of the primary search terms related to your business, its products and services should appear frequently throughout your stream. There’s no need to go overboard; simply strive for using them organically and naturally in your tweets.
Try not to truncate. Because Twitter has a character limit, people often truncate words and use text-speak in their tweets. If you are using Twitter as a marketing vehicle I caution against this approach, other than perhaps using the most common abbreviations such as U, 2, or 4, to mean you, to, or for. Why? Because if your consumers are not comfortable deciphering text-speak you risk alienating them. And they’ll likely skip right over your tweets. So tweet for your prospect and assume they are not as text savvy as the active Twitterer. This is another reason to invest your time and energy in constructing meaningful yet concise tweets.
Proofread your tweets. Because Twitter encourages swift communication many Twitterers post tweets that are not speald quiet write. Remember, Twitter is no different than any other outlet you use to communicate with customers. If you proofread every email, flyer, ad, brochure, and newsletter you distribute, it’s because you know that errors, though slight, leave an impression. They speak to the issue of quality (or lack of it). Naturally, your tweets deserve a pass through quality control as well; they will speak just as loudly as all your other communication materials.
Twitter may be in its infancy as a marketing vehicle, but it still has muscle. That’s why it’s important to realize that “short and sweet” does not mean “sloppy and scattered.” If you appreciate the power your tweets can have, you’ll be able to effectively leverage one of the fastest growing free social media tools available.

I am no Twitter veteran but I have been writing copy for marketing-related initiatives for nearly 25 years. So once I joined Twitter, it didn’t take me long to realize that many companies using Twitter as a marketing vehicle are making some key mistakes when they tweet.

Here are six tips for creating tweets that will help you more effectively market your products and services, as well as build your brand:

  1. Treat Twitter like any other marketing vehicle. Twitter may be a relatively new tool, but it still has power. So before you start tapping away random tweets and trying to connect with other Twitterers, take time to think about how you want to use Twitter to support your current marketing strategy. Don’t just wing it. Research what the experts say in terms of what makes it an effective tool. (Hint: it does not involve posting an endless stream of sales messages. It involves finding ways to add value and to engage.)
  2. Know your audience. As with any marketing vehicle, you need to keep your target market and your consumer in mind at all times. Do not assume that all of your Twitter followers are your buyers. They are not. Instead, stay focused and clear on who you want to reach and what you want to say. Then be certain that every tweet appeals to your audience of potential prospects and consumers in some way, rather than simply the Twitter masses.
  3. Craft your tweets with care. Because of its sense of immediacy, I see many companies take a hurried, somewhat careless approach to their tweets. For the simple reason that you have the smallest space possible for your tweet message (140 characters or less), you should take time to write it well. When you have an idea for a tweet, write it several different ways. What are you trying to accomplish with that tweet? Do you want to draw in your reader? Are you looking for feedback? Do you want to provide customers with a special offer? Are you hoping to pass along important information or a useful link? Every tweet, regardless of its content, can be structured myriad ways. Make the effort to draft several versions, making each one clear and compelling. Pick the strongest. Then post it. If there are several you like, create a library that will allow you to post different versions at various times.
  4. Lace your tweets with keywords. Not every tweet needs to feature keywords, but certainly some of the primary search terms related to your business, its products and services should appear frequently throughout your stream. There’s no need to go overboard; simply strive for using them organically and naturally in your tweets.
  5. Try not to truncate. Because Twitter has a character limit, people often truncate words and use text-speak in their tweets. If you are using Twitter as a marketing vehicle I caution against this approach, other than perhaps using the most common abbreviations such as U, 2, or 4, to mean you, to, or for. Why? Because if your consumers are not comfortable deciphering text-speak you risk alienating them. And they’ll likely skip right over your tweets. So tweet for your prospect and assume they are not as text savvy as the active Twitterer. This is another reason to invest your time and energy in constructing meaningful yet concise tweets.
  6. Proofread your tweets. Because Twitter encourages swift communication many Twitterers post tweets that are not speald quiet write. Remember, Twitter is no different than any other outlet you use to communicate with customers. If you proofread every email, flyer, ad, brochure, and newsletter you distribute, it’s because you know that errors, though slight, leave an impression. They speak to the issue of quality (or lack of it). Naturally, your tweets deserve a pass through quality control as well; they will speak just as loudly as all your other communication materials.

Twitter may be in its infancy as a marketing vehicle, but it still has muscle. That’s why it’s important to realize that “short and sweet” does not mean “sloppy and scattered.” If you appreciate the power your tweets can have, you’ll be able to effectively leverage one of the fastest growing free social media tools available.